Why are we still paying for postage? | Letters to the editor | The Globe and Mail

“However, in order to provide the players with the support and financial stability that they need, we have decided to discontinue the practice of sending players envelopes with the amount of money received for the family member, in exchange for the player’s signature. “

“This has been in place for a long time, and we know it will continue for some time. “

“Our goal is always to ensure that players receive the support they need for their families and to support their careers, and this will continue regardless of what the players decide to do. “

“We understand that many of you are upset by the decision to discontinuance the practice. “

While we respect that, this is the only option available to us. “

We understand that many of you are upset by the decision to discontinuance the practice.

“Thank you for your continued support. “

“Sincerely,” David Branch, NHLPA executive director. “

The NHL did not immediately respond to a request for comment. “

Sincerely,” David Branch, NHLPA executive director.

The NHL did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The letter was the first to go out in recent days from the union.

The players’ group is seeking an extension of the current $3,500 envelope fee, which is $30 less than the average for the past five years.

The envelope fee has been a thorn in the side of many players.

The average fee for a new family member is $4,300.

Players have long complained that they are being paid more than the players they are replacing, as a result of the $7,500 increase in the average envelope fee over the last five years, which they argue is out of proportion to the cost of a new parent’s child.

The union also wants the league to allow players to pay their own medical bills.

In an effort to improve player welfare, the NHL has changed the policy of allowing players to use the $2,000 “bargain” rate to cover the costs of care for players and their families, including the cost to the team of providing the health care they need.

In exchange for agreeing to the $3 million envelope fee for the players, the players are asking for $15,000 in salary cap relief for the next two seasons.

In the letter, the union said it will work to ensure the players receive more money in the coming years, including in the form of a $15 million bonus.

NHLPA president Donald Fehl said the players group is disappointed with the decision.

“I’m disappointed in the NHL for doing this,” Fehr said.

“In our view, this has been an ongoing process, and I think that this is an example of where the players would like to see the NHL and the owners work together.”

Fehr also said the union would like the league, NHL Network and other broadcasters to show a “better representation of the game.”